2 day trip

Mysore – The exquisite arts of peasants and daily lives of royalty

On the way to Mysore we have often stopped at Janapada Loka for a cool green oasis on a regular drive. It being next to an eatery that serves local Karnataka fare doesn’t hurt either. We’d recommend you don’t visit in a hurry…it’s a space to wander around and stumble across something interesting and enlightening at every corner.

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We started off with the living quarters of the people of the Western ghats of Karnataka. It’s ingenious  use of local material and resources to store and treat their food , their utensils and handmade roofs are fascinating windows into their lives.

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The space is sprinkled with ancient artefacts with effortless ease. Whether it’s an intricately carved chariot or a casually placed stone carving that’s gently embraced by the vegetation around.

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Not a real person

We’d strongly recommend waiting a while outside the museums in different buildings spread over the space- someone usually hurries over and opens it up so you can walk in. While a guide gave us an overview of each exhibit, he requested us to pause for a minute while he sang for us. Taken by surprise but curious we did so- and he started….we were taken aback by how enthralling his booming voice was! He needed no mike/instruments to let his clear voice ring through the museum.Even for someone who has lived all their lives in Karnataka – the sheer number of tribes, their vivid and intricate outfits, dance forms each with their own impressive costumes, jewelry and handicrafts will leave you spell bound. We’d recommend picking up a piece of pottery from the lady who makes them on a wheel in the premises- it’s inexpensive and beautiful.

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Buy from here! They’re pretty as can be and very inexpensive

We couldn’t decide if we’d go to Somanathpura or Talakadu first but at random headed towards the latter. We almost got there and saw swarms of people on foot walking towards what seemed like a village festival. As it turned out, the road towards Talakadu was blocked to accommodate the Ugadi festival celebrations. So we had to turn back disappointed towards Somanathpura instead. We were however starving by now and there weren’t any restaurants in sight. We finally found a small yellow door by the side of the street that claimed to be a hotel . As it turned out it was a tiny place frequented by the locals that served good home cooked vegetarian meal with an extra touch of hospitality urging us to eat more. Satiated, we headed off to the 12th century Chennakesava temple at Somanathapura. Despite it being a second time for us, it was still charmed us with its intricate carvings on the temple we well remember as resting on the star shaped base.

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The outer walls have several layers each with a rough theme, the lowest with playful elephants in myriad poses, above that the camels, horses and armed riders, above that flowers , fruits and wildlife and yet above that entire stories from the Hindu epics that one can see in order on walking clockwise. A closer look and one would find several avatars of the Lord Vishnu to whom this temple is dedicated along with many other powerful Gods and Goddesses too.

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We spent a while strolling through its long corridors and admiring the large but smooth lathe turned pillars too.

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One should not miss looking up the ceiling despite the barely lit interiors cause they are a delight in themselves. On our way out we were enthused to see the numerous butterflies flitting about the well kept garden around the temple too.

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Our next stop was the Ambavilas palace, more often simply known as the Mysore palace. It is the geographical center of the city of Mysore and one simply cannot not-pass by it even on a casual trip to Mysore.

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The Ambavilas palace with the backdrop of the monsoon clouds

The insides of the palace are luxurious and opulent- no two ways about it. The colorful, gleaming tiles, polished and gilded pillars, elaborate chandeliers, the mindfully painted ceilings with each mural competing with the other on elegance and its sheer scale leaves you fascinated.

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Stunning symmetry

One can only walk by and marvel at the life and times of royalty holding court and just going about their day in its premises. One can also drop into the smaller palace beside the Ambavilas palace to see displayed toys and memorabilia from the royal families daily living.

 

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The palace complex itself has 12 major temples dedicated to Godesses Bhuvaneshwari, Gayatri and different avatars of Lord Shiva and Vishnu each with its own allure.

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If lucky one might see the royal elephants shuffling about the place too. The Palace is illuminated in the evenings all sundays, public holidays and during the festival of Dasara.

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After dinner, we drove up to the Chamundi hills for a view of Mysore while spotting the lit up landmarks awarding points to ourselves for the right ones. [Do note : earlier vehicles used to stop at several points along the way up the Chamundi hills. Now there are designated spots patrolled by staff in plain clothes so do ensure you find one and stop accordingly to stay safe.]

 

The next morning we headed off to what’s become a staple of our visits to Mysore– a cycle ride around the Karanji lake checking in on our feathered friends at the aviary too. We’d highly recommend this even if you’re on a short trip to mysore- it’s an oasis of calm and green that lets you forget the world for a bit.

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Looks like it takes a lot of preening to look as good as they do

A peek at the local market later, we headed off to Melkote- we’d been there once before but it had been a hurried pit stop.

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We first encountered the Akka-Thangi Kola (sisters’ pond) which are the adjoining ponds one slightly larger than the other with potable and brackish water in the Thagi Kola and the Akka Kola respectively.

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Further on, one can walk to the Rayagopura which is what would have been the entrance to the town- but was however unfinished.

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Climbing atop it provides a view of the surrounding villages.

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While the Yoganarasimha swamy temple is atop the hill, we instead dropped in to the Cheluvanarayanaswamy temple which is right at the center of Melkote town. It is believed to have been worshipped by both Lord Rama and those of the dynasty of Lord Krishna and is therefore accorded a special place in religious lore. While the temple itself is simple for the most part, it is worth a visit just for its pillars- ornately carved with hollowed out areas lets us truly appreciate the artistry, skill and attention to detail from the eras gone by.

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We ended the trip the same way we had, one to Melkote several months earlier, at the main temple pond- Kalyani/Pushkarni.

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This one is truly an amalgamation of the town that is Melkote- a group of priests performing prayers, shepherds with their frolicking goats, children playing around the ancient pillared corridors, families resting after their pilgrimage to the temple, and some locals diving into the familiar waters of the pond.

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While we rested at the octagonal shaped Bhuvaneshwari mantapa recapping the past couple of days and enjoying the view- the spot itself was a reminder on what was perhaps the kindest way to let history survive- by letting it be an active part of the present.

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