3 day trip

Shimoga – of temples and backwaters

Shimoga has always been close to our hearts- especially in the monsoons, and so one Friday afternoon we head off towards our rainy destination. While debating dinner plans, we instead decided to stop in at the Chaat street within the Shimoga town. Considering it’s a relatively small town with not many options for a late meal- this is a perfect option that’s open up even till 11pm.  The perfect paddus impressed us all, but interesting options were also the akki rotti and the chaats, both with an unmistakable local flavour. A bowl of fruits for dessert and we were ready to call it a night.

IMG_5246.jpg
Try the paddu- it may convert you even if you weren’t a fan earlier!

On our drive through the brilliant green lining the roads passing by several bridges across the gushing rivers , our first detour was on seeing a board towards the Umamaheshwara temple at Hosgunda. Renovation work has been going on a while on the temple originally built by the little known Shantara dynasty. It’s amidst 600 acres of forest and has been declared by the Govt as a “devara kadu”  or forest of the gods but is being renovated by a religious institution.

IMG_5276.jpg
Umamaheshwara temple

 

The pushkarni of the temple paints a pretty picture amidst the surrounding greenery in the mild drizzle that met us when we got there. While the temple itself is relatively simple, the 45 feet pillar nestled in the grass that pads your feet welcomes you right at the entrance and erotic sculptures line the outside of the temple.

 

The Rameshwara temple was our next stop at Keladi, the first capital of the Keladi Nayakas who later shifted their capital to Ikkeri, that we had visited on an earlier trip.

IMG_1755.jpg
Rameshwara temple

The exterior looks more like the home of a wealthy landlord from a bygone era than the stereotypical temple structure we’re used to.

IMG_1718.jpg
Rameshwara temple

There are 3 shrines within , one of Rameswara, Virabhadra and the Devi temple. The temple itself is quite fascinating with something interesting wherever you turn.

IMG_1740.jpg
Rameshwara temple

Whether it is the Krishna engraved on the Tulsi pot, the engraved ram with a namaste gesture at the entrance of the garbagriha , the meticulous engraving on the bottom of the flag post or the lovely wood work on the ceiling of one shrine and stone carvings on the others.

IMG_1749.jpg
Rameshwara temple

 

When one mentions Shimoga, the landmark destination to visit is Jog Falls– the most popular of the sights in the district. It’s confusingly called the 3rd and the 2nd highest plunge waterfall in India on the same Wiki page- so I guess we’ll never know now! We visited in June, but we’d recommend dropping by (no pun intended) in August. There are 2 view points to view the Jog falls and standing on one side you’d be able to see people climbing down the stairs on the other side.

IMG_1766.jpg
The Jog falls- a few weeks later and it was a whole lot more forceful and stunning.

It is a tricky spot to decide when to visit, since sometimes it’s so well covered with mist that you have no view of the falls at all.What we can however ensure, is that you’d love the pineapples from the vendors selling them just outside. The region grows pineapples in plenty and they’re simply delicious.

 

We had decided to visit a bunch of waterfalls including the Dabbe falls and almost got there but then were informed by a local that one required to get written permission quite a distance away before actually making a visit. We’d spent too much time already and decided to skip them instead. Do note for your trips and plan accordingly.

 

We instead opted to go to Honnemaradu(the place with golden sand). Quite a distance near Honnemaradu needs to be traversed through a narrow path way lined with trees on one side and bushes blocking your view of the water on the other.

IMG_1781.jpg
Honnemaradu

 

Note:the road towards the water is extremely precarious especially in the rains. There are trees frequently fallen across the road that may block your path entirely and the road is not laid out- so the muddy path makes it essential to decide with care whether your automobile can take it. Getting stuck in the mud on the narrow road would not be a fun experience.

 

Just as we got there, the rains decided it was time to pour. Our trusty ponchos covering us, we made our way. For someone who hadn’t looked up the place, or even if you did- the first view of the water is stunning. It is the backwater of the river Sharavati and the scene is something out of a dream. The still water with only the drops of rain causing a stir, the upturned coracles on the bank, a view of the tiny island near by, the bare trees long- drowned in the dam waters still upright due to sheer grit – all make up a surreal scene.

IMG_1791.jpg
Honnemaradu

Our pictures don’t do justice since the rain risked our devices and only a few quick ones could be shot- however, not all memories need to be stored digitally- some need to be left to your mind to store away and savour another day. The man recording our entry in the books just before we reached the place, offered us a coracle ride- and we were grateful he did. It’s hard to forget the experience of just us, the rains, and the perfect scene in the lone coracle on backwaters of the River Sharavati.

IMG_5317.jpg
Honnemaradu

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s