1 day trip · 4 day trip

Bijapur- Of origami mosques and kite flying

After an overnight bus from Bangalore dropped us in Bijapur one fine morning, and a quick round of freshening up, we hired an auto rickshaw for the day to take us around the historical city of Bijapur.

Jamia Masjid/Jama Masjid/Jami Masjid (all names used in various articles of literature) is said to be the largest mosque in the Deccan plateau during the medieval times. It is a white , large and calm spot within the city. The first aspect of the building one notices on entering it are the arches in clean lines when looking up inside the mosque- for some reason it reminds me of origami folds.IMG_4050.jpg

The tiles in the prayer hall were interestingly made to look like prayer rugs and the most special/ornate part of the mosque is the mehrab with Persian inscriptions inscribed in black and gold. The kind caretaker even translated a line for us on our request. It is said that the mosque was originally built by Ali Adil Shah who was from the Shi’ite sect of Islam- hence the simple structure of the mosque- but the inscriptions were added on later by the Sunni king Muhammed Adil Shah. The money for building this structure is said to have come from the battle of TaliKota were the kings defeated Rama Raja in the 1500s. Aurangazeb contributed to the structure by adding a gate to it in his time. The large square courtyard also has a tank for ablutions before prayer. It is believed that there is sufficient place for 20,000 people to pray in the premises within the gate simultaneously.IMG_6191.jpg

Just a few meters away, the driver then took us to see the facade of Mahtar Mahal Masjid. The pretty jharokas(windows) instantly transport you to Gujarat/Rajasthan despite being on one side of a narrow busy lane. It is said that this 17th century structure was built when the king Adil Shah donated a large sum of money to a sweeper since a soothsayer advised him to do so to cure his leprosy- whether it helped or not is not entirely clear :). So well that gave the structure it’s name that translates to “Sweeper’s Palace”. However there are a bunch more legends around it so we personally cannot be certain of its origin.IMG_4066.jpg

Our next stop was my favourite of the day – Asar Mahal. Asar Mahal said to house two strands of hair from the Prophet’s beard (second strangest thing I’ve heard since the wars over Budhha’s tooth in Srilanka). It functions as a mosque now and therefore women are prohibited from entering it. Didn’t dampen my time there, since I found the reservoir next to it much more interesting – there were kids in all sizes having a great time- some being instructed by a teacher under a tree, some flying a kite, some more playing gilli-danda – all quite interested in us and in being photographed with their younger siblings. It made me wish I too had carried a kite along! The reservoir was built to commemorate Taj Sultana, King Ibrahim II’s 1st wife.IMG_4086.jpg

Gagan mahal– All that’s left of this 16th century palace are the still-standing-wall and the majestic arches aptly aiming to reach the sky. The space in front of it is a well maintained park used by locals to take a break from their day or kids to frolic around. The structure was meant to be the royal residence and the royal court by the Sultan Ali Adil Shah.IMG_4099.jpg

Barah Kaman: is a 17th century unfinished mausoleum of Ali Adil Shah II, his wife, daughters and his mistresses. Earlier called Ali Roza to indicate the king’s name it was changed to Barah Kaman since it was the 12th monument to be built during the reign of Shah Nawaz Khan. It’s quite a dramatic structure that leads one to wonder how it would look complete. Succeeding to the throne at the young age of 18, Ali Adil Shah II struggled with battling the Marathas and the Mughal invasionsIMG_4142.jpg

Jod gumbaz – from outside it’s an almost non-descript old building but was one of the only spaces here that seemed to have a huge section of spiritual followers, even waiting in line to offer their prayers. We were charmed by a lady with stunning tribal jewellery and attire also in the queue. However it isn’t as well maintained as some of the other structures in Bijapur. Jod(pair) refers to 2 mausoleums that house tombs of Khan Muhammad and Abdul Razzaq Qadiri – the general and spiritual advisor of the young Adil Shahi Ruler Sikander who helped Aurangazeb defeat their king.IMG_4151.jpg

We next made our way to Taj bawdi, a pond built by Ibrahim Adil Shah in memory of his wife, Taj Sultana. To avoid the place being dirtied, it can only be viewed from outside today but is still an impressive pond with flights of stairs leading to the water and a few rest houses meant for travelers also seen on the other side. However just outside it we met a huge group that were celebrating their village festival and had taken a break right there to have lunch they’d carried along.IMG_4159.jpg

By this time we were starving and yearning for some kadak roti with ennegayi but unfortunately the restaurant we found had only north Indian food. Only half day in and we gobbled our food to continue on our way.

Update : Belgaum: Chorla Ghat and its surprises

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