3 day trip

Belgaum: Chorla Ghat and its surprises

After Gol Gumbaz and catching a quick breakfast, we headed to the bus station to make our way to Belgaum. We had booked in advance which turned out to be unnecessary with the sheer number of buses that ply between the 2 districts. In fact, it seemed like online bookings for those buses were so uncommon that most staff at the bus station were confused why we’d book it online+ weren’t sure which bus our ticket referred to.After some back and forth, they came to an agreement on the bus we should board.

 

It was supposed to be a short journey and we settled in to our seats- however not all things go as planned and so the bus had trouble mid-way and had to stop. The bus conductor and driver stopped buses passing by, to request them to accommodate the stranded passengers. Also the heat was at its peak since it was now around 11:30am, and the roadside didn’t have much cover. Since there were families with babies and older people, we let them go ahead and boarded the last bus that accommodated us. Luckily other than being ravenous and covered with a layer of dust by the time we reached Belgaum, there wasn’t much damage due to the delay.

 

After a heart lunch at a restaurant very close from the bus stand, we decided to walk to our hotel which was 15 mins away.Incidentally our hotel was in the possibly busiest areas of Belgaum which is the market. This also gave us a chance to get snapshots of what Belgaum was about in all its bustle by the time we got to the hotel. A quick shower and nap later we were refreshed enough to head-out to pick up our rental bike. It’s not often that we recommend services on our site, but we’ll have to with this one. It’s run by a young, earnest gentleman who’s passionate about bikes and has the most adorable German shepherd who loves to play. The bike was also well maintained since they don’t just rent bikes but also function as a bike service centre.

 

With not much time with daylight left, we decided to head inside the Belgaum fort. The significant area inside the fort now houses military training and housing sections and at built into the narrow entrance of the fort is the Military Durga Devi Mandir – it is tradition for the military staff to keep the lamps burning in the temple. Driving by, in just a couple of minutes we got to the Kamal Basadi. A 13th century structure in black stone with flawlessly smooth pillars built by a minister in the Ralta Dynasty. The temple’s name is derived from its design that is supposed to be shaped like 72 lotus petals.IMG_4353.jpg

Just beside it is the Chikki basadi– which also has its own charm with dancing figures and animal motifs on the outside too.IMG_4360.jpg

We spent some time in the calm green space watching contrails of jets criss crossing the blue sky. With my love for large stained glass windows, we moved on to the St.Mary’s church built in a very impressive Gothic style but found it closed.IMG_4518.jpg

As daylight faded we made our way back to the hotel passing by Ganesha pandals on every street elegantly designed playing devotional songs mildly vs the garish decorations and loud “music” some other parts of the state have taken a preference for. We spent the evening walking the streets stopping by for some delicious and interesting soda flavors even including one of chilly!IMG_6219.jpg After picking up a must-have- an Ilkal saree for myself, and  a quick dinner, we decided to catch up on our rest for the next day’s ride to Chorla Ghat.

Chorla Ghat is a section of the Western ghats that is at the intersection of the 3 states- Goa, Maharashtra and Karnataka. This time we were heading towards it from Karnataka. In search of more waterfalls and greenery we passed by lush trees on either side of a beautiful road. While the road through it is itself quite lovely one has to take a not-so-clear deviation off-roading in order to visit the waterfalls sprinkled about the region.IMG_4385

Many folks reach these waterfalls via a trek/hike up the route we took, but we’d recommend a really sturdy bike if you’re not walking. The route while being perfectly stunning is also quite backbreaking. We were served one delightful scene after another with the fields in perfect shades of green and the sky competing with its fluffy white clouds against just the right blue. IMG_4381.jpgWhole stretches were covered with blooms in pink and yellow, and we rode through streams along the way. We were sorry to disturb a lovely sunbathing snake that slithered away into the bushes. After quite a drive we decided to stop at this serene meadow of a spot overlooking endless layers of hills changing color with the clouds that floated above them.IMG_4391 It was decidedly one of the best spots we’ve ever come across on our travels with just the two of us at the edge of what looked like an utopian new world. IMG_6264.jpgWe wandered around the place and realized we had in fact reached the Chikhale falls. It was not at its best since the monsoons weren’t at their peak but it was still our favorite surprise of the day.IMG_6289.jpg

Note :Maps do not help out here! We found them quite incorrect and we’d strongly recommend asking the very few locals you may meet on your way instead.

IMG_4430.jpg

More riding across pretty scenes and muddy roads we reached a junction with directions to the Sural waterfalls. Where one gets to is more of a view point to see the waterfall in brilliant white piercing through the deep green pristine surroundings.IMG_4452.jpg

A ride further ahead, and we saw the route shown by maps lead to a dead end with a path under construction and heavily dug up. However, there was a kind gentleman and his wife who insisted we’d get lost and let us follow them all the way to the nearest village to Sada waterfalls. They further introduced us to a gentleman who came with us the rest of the way till we reached what was less a village and more a group of houses and parked there. The “guide” let us leave our helmets, and park our bikes and after checking we had water took us along our way to the Sada waterfalls.

Up next: Bijapur – Of whispering echoes and carved calligraphy

 

 

One thought on “Belgaum: Chorla Ghat and its surprises

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s